Victoria, Italianate

Col. Hubbard Morgan House

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

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96 School Street

1860: An officer in the Second Regiment of Horse Artillery of the Militia of Connecticut, Colonel Hubbard D. Morgan was later involved in the lumber and ship-timber trade.  About 1845 he and others experimented to extract oil from menhaden fish and then set up the firm Morgan & Gallup that was highly successful selling it.

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

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131 Monument Street

1866: Capt. Ebenezer Morgan’s had this large Italianate built after his record voyage and he went into business, banking and real estate.  One business was the New London based Alaskan Commercial Company in which he played a principal role and for which he sailed and became the first person to plant the American flag on Alaskan soil, securing a lucrative monopoly lease for his company. He also became a philanthropist.  When he died in this house in 1890 his estate was valued at $1 million.

Elisha Miner

Capt. Ebenezer Morgan House

Avery-Copp House Museum

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192 Monument Street

1866: Elisha Miner was an architect and builder of many mid-19th century houses on Groton Bank.  This is the last on he built as the residence in which he lived.  Other house that he designed and built included Capt. Ebenezer Morgan's first house of 1851 on Broad Street and the Betsy A. Perry House of c. 1855 across the street, and Elisha Miner's "cottage" of  c. 1856 just south of this one which he built as the last residence.  Several of his houses had unique curved wide eaves as does this one.

Avery-Copp House Museum

Avery-Copp House Museum

Avery-Copp House Museum

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154 Thames Street

Mid 1870s: An early 1800s colonial remodeled in the 1870s to an Italianate style.  Belton Copp who lived here at that time was prominent banker becoming a Trustee and Vice President of the Savings Bank of New London. Today the house is the Avery-Copp Museum, providing a time capsule of the life of a prosperous village family of a century ago.

Groton Baptist Church

Avery-Copp House Museum

Groton Baptist Church

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76 Broad Street

1872: The Groton Bank Baptist Church was founded in 1843 and this 1872 Italianate structure was its second meeting-house.  In 1887 the church's name was changed to the Groton Heights Baptist Church.

Hellen M. Allen House

Avery-Copp House Museum

Groton Baptist Church

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1879: This large ornate Victorian was built for Hellen Allen, daughter of the second minister of the Groton Bank (now Heights) Baptist Church, Nicholas T. Allen, who was an active promoter of the plan to open Church Street. 

Victorian, Carpenter Gothic

Capt. John W. Miner House

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

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c. 1867: Captain Miner sailed packet ships, a major form of coastal transportation.  Typical of the Gothic style, the house has a steeply pitched roof with elaborate scrollwork bargeboards on the eaves.

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

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c. 1885

Capt. Edward T. Pettigrew House

1875: Another example is the Seabury Memorial Church, named in honor of Groton-born Rev. Samuel Seabury, first American to be consecrated as a protestant Episcopal bishop.  Today it is an Islamic center.  (No photo).

Victorian, French Mansard - Second Empire

James A. Morgan House

James A. Morgan House

James A. Morgan House

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1875: This is a fine example of the Second Empire period of architecture.  The house was built for J. A. Morgan by Benjamin F. Gallup.

Henry Collins House

James A. Morgan House

James A. Morgan House

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1873

James A. Morgan House

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Victorian, Cottage Style

James M. Latham House

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

James M. Latham House

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1856

Elisha Minor Cottage

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

James M. Latham House

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1856

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

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1876: Capt. James Waterman Buddington built this cottage, his first house, next to the Greek Revival house of his father, James Monroe Buddington.   James W. was a cabin boy on his fathers voyage that discovered the abandonded British ship the "Resolute". During his career he was a whaler and sealer on 55 different vessels, some with his father.  James W. was a successful captain having years later purchased a very expensive large house a couple of blocks north of this house.  That house burned was rebuilt and burned again. Could his father’s “Resolute desk” have been in it?  James W. made the last whaling voyage from New London Harbor returning in 1909—thus ending the whaling era. 

Captain William H. Avery House

Captain William H. Avery House

Capt. James Waterman Buddington House

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88 Baker Avenue

18xx

Captain William H. Avery House

Another example

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Captain William H. Avery House

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Victorian, Stick Style

Capt. Jason Randall House

Capt. Jason Randall House

Capt. Jason Randall House

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67 Ramsdell Street

c.. 1890: Capt Jason Randall's house is shown here with its carriage house in the rear.  He managed, owned and controlled many vessels trading in ice, coal and lumber.  Among his boats were the Florence Randall and Adelaide Randall.  Jason Randall was active in the Groton Congregational Church and was one of six major contributors to the construction of its new church building in 1902. 

Additional example

Capt. Jason Randall House

Capt. Jason Randall House

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Additional Example

Capt. Jason Randall House

Additional Example

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Victorian, Queen Anne Style

Thomas A. Miner House

Noank Community Services Building

Thomas A. Miner House

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5 Meridian Street

1894: Thomas A. Miner was a businessman—senior vice president of the Mariner’s Savings Bank in New London, founder and president of the Groton Grain Co., a president of the Groton Monument Association and a deacon in the Groton Congregational Church.  Deacon Miner was instrumental in having the new 1902 stone church building (see old English architecture) located across the street from his house and was one of six major contributors to its construction. 

The house displays a variety of exterior surface textures and patterns characteristic of the Queeen Anne style--cut shingles on the third floor level, clapboards on the first and second floor levels divided by stick style trimwork.  In addition it has sunburst patterns above many windows and under the eaves, as well as ornamental brackets under the eaves. The steep roofline is ornamented with pinnacles on the peaks and two decorative chimneys. 

George Marquardt

Noank Community Services Building

Thomas A. Miner House

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1903: Charles Marquardt, along with his brothers George and Christian, was a builder of  many houses and larger buildings, e.g. the stone Congregational Church, on Groton Bank.

This Queen Anne exihibits a prominent 3 story tower.  The house has exterior surfaces of shingle, clapboard and other decorative trimwork.

Noank Community Services Building

Noank Community Services Building

Noank Community Services Building

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306 Thames Street

A Queen Anne "painted lady" on Thames Street in the Groton Bank

Avery-Copp House Carriage House

Avery-Copp House Carriage House

Noank Community Services Building

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174 Thames Street

Smith Street House

Avery-Copp House Carriage House

Smith Street House

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116 Smith Street 

Additional Example

Avery-Copp House Carriage House

Smith Street House

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Example of Victorian paint combinations

Additional Example

Additional Example

Additional Example

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Wrap around porch

Additional Example

Additional Example

Additional Example

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Turret feature

Additional Example

Additional Example

Additional Example